Advancing science and implementing novel, cutting edge Technologies

StemBANCC aims to provide well characterised patient derived induced pluripotent stem cell lines and associated biomaterials in an accessible and sustainable bio-bank. StemBANCC also aims to demonstrate proof of concept for the utility of induced pluripotent stem cells in drug discovery for hard-to-treat disorders.

 

 

Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University

Department of Human Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry

Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv 69978 Israel

 

medicine.tau.ac.il

 

Project leader

 
Prof. Shimon Efrat
The Nancy Gluck Regan Chair in Juvenile Diabetes
Phone +972 3 640 7701
Fax +972 3 640 9950
E-Mail  

Institute presentation

Tel Aviv University is the country‘s largest academic institution. Its faculty is comprised of nationally and internationally renowned scholars and scientists, many of whom are leaders in their fields. Tel Aviv University is a major center of teaching and research, comprising nine faculties, 106 departments, and 90 research institutes. Tel Aviv University is the largest comprehensive research university in Israel and participated in 50 projects in FP5, 75 projects in FP6, and 78 projects in FP7.

The Sackler School of Medicine is Israel's largest institute of higher medical education, including approximately 1000 teachers in preclinical departments and in affiliated clinical departments and institutes, located in seven major medical centers, six psychiatric hospitals, and a large rehabilitation center

Prof. Shimon Efrat is the Nancy Gluck Regan Chair in Juvenile Diabetes at the Sackler School of Medicine. His research during the past 23 years, first at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, and then at Tel Aviv University, has focused on understanding the regulation of pancreatic beta-cell replication and differentiation, with the goal of developing a cell replacement therapy for diabetes. In the past 3 years he has collaborated with Prof. Nissim Benvenisty at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem in generation of iPS cells from human beta cells and their characterization.

Relevant expertise: Beta-cell expansion; nuclear reprogramming; epigenetic memory; iPS cells; differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into insulin-producing cells; cell transplantation into hyperglycemic mice.

 

Research Center in Growth and Signaling
24 Rue du Fg St Jacques
75014 Paris, France

 

cochin.inserm.fr

 

Project leader

 
Dr. Raphael Scharfmann
 
Phone +33 1 44 41 24 76
Fax +33 1 43 06 04 43
E-Mail  

Institute presentation

Raphael Scharfmann obtained his PhD in 1989 at University Paris VII, France. He next did a post doc at the Salk institute (1989-1991) and obtained a permanent position at INSERM at the end of 1991. In 1999, he obtained the prestigious Minkowski Award (for distinguished research in the field of Diabetes in Europe). He is now research director at INSERM within the Growth and Signaling Center (University Paris Descartes). The major objective of his group is to define intercellular signals regulating beta cell development in rodent and human.

 

Department of Genetic Medicine and Development
CMU, 1 rue Michel-Servet
1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland

 

ige3.unige.ch

 

Project leader

 
Prof. Emmanouil Dermitzakis
 
Phone +41 22 379 5483
Fax +41 22 379 57068
E-Mail  

Project staff

 
Dr. Sabine Rutti
 
Phone +41 22 379 5541
Fax +41 22 379 5528
E-Mail  

Institute presentation

The University of Geneva is recognised as one of the leading centres in the world for diabetes research and more specifically beta cell studies. The University Medical Centre provides a multidisciplinary environment with Core Facilities offering access to contemporary equipment and expertise in FACS, bioimaging, genomics and proteomics. The Department of Genetic Medicine and Development brings together leading international groups with expertise in human genetics and transcriptomics, as well as molecular and cell biology of the beta cell. Close collaboration with the Islet Transplantation Unit in the neighbouring University Hospital offers an unusually rich supply of human islets for research.

Department of Physiology
Fritz-Pregl-Strasse 3
A-6020 INNSBRUCK

 

physiologie.i-med.ac.at

 

Project leader

 
Paul Jennings, PhD
 
Phone +43 512 9003 70826
Fax +43 512 9003 73800
E-Mail  

Project staff

 
Gerhard Gstraunthaler, PhD
 
Phone +43 512 9003 70810
Fax +43 512 9003 73800
E-Mail  

 

 

 
Anja Wilmes, PhD
 
Phone +43 512 9003 70839
Fax +43 512 9003 73800
E-Mail  

Institute presentation

The kidney is the main regulatory organ of the body, maintaining the composition and volume of the blood. It functions to remove waste products, to reabsorb electrolytes, water, amino acids and glucose and also to control extracellular fluid pH. In addition, the kidney has important endocrine functions; controlling the amount of erythrocytes in circulation and the regulation of calcium and phosphorous uptake in the gut.

Due to the high oxidative demand, efficient transport systems and presence of phase I and II metabolising enzymes the kidney, and particularly the proximal tubule, is highly susceptible to injury brought about by pharmaceuticals and chemicals. Diabetes, cardiovascular disease and aging are also major risk factors for renal disease development. Our research at the Division of Physiology, Innsbruck Medical Physiology, focuses to many of these aspects by studying the effect of chemical and environmental stressors in animal and human cell cultures. Using classical assays together with state of the art high content omic technologies we are unravelling the mechanism underlying renal epithelial function and dysfunction. This information will help us build better non-animal based predictive models for human drug and chemical safety, will aid biomarker discovery and will potentially provide targets for pharmaceutical intervention.

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